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Daily List 144

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Monday 28 July 2014

Environment

Growing a circular economy: ending the throwaway society: third report of session 2014-15: report, together with formal minutes relating to the report.

House of Commons papers (2014-15) - 214.
Corporate Author:
Environmental Audit Committee
Author:
Joan Walley (chairman)

There are potentially billions of pounds of benefits for UK businesses in becoming more resource efficient, creating a circular economy. But the vast array of different area-by-area recycling regimes in England is confusing and makes it harder for companies to access valuable materials that could be reused. The variety of different recycling services also means there cannot be consistent on-pack information about a product's recyclability to help households. The Government should give new guidance to local authorities in England to standardise recycling collections to create new economic opportunities, as Wales and Scotland have done. The Committee wants the Government to support EU proposals to increase recycling rates to 70% by 2030 and to reform taxation and producer responsibility regulations to reward companies that design greener products. Differential VAT rates should be introduced based on the environmental impact or recycled content of products. The Government should work with the EU to establish eco-design standards across a range of products to make them easier to repair, upgrade, or recycle. Councils should stop sending food waste to landfill. Just 400,000 tonnes of food waste is separately collected for organic recycling in the UK out of the 7.2 million tonnes thrown out by households every year. Instead this food waste could be collected separately and composted or used in anaerobic digesters to produce biogas and renewable energy and fertiliser. The Government's current approach to these issues lacks ambition and leadership and it should learn from the strategic vision that other countries have adopted.

  • ISBN: 9780215075536
  • 11.00
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Law & Order

The work of the Immigration Directorates (October-December 2013): third report of session 2014-15: report, together with formal minutes relating to the report.

House of Commons papers (2014-15) - 237.
Corporate Author:
Home Affairs Committee
Author:
Keith Vaz (chairman)

This report focuses on sham marriages which represent a significant threat to immigration control. The bogus spouse acquires not only the right to reside in the UK but the right to bring their children, grandchildren, parents and grandparents to live here with them. The Home Office has estimated that between 4,000 and 10,000 applications to stay in the UK in 2013 were made on the basis of a sham marriage, though the actual figure is unknown. Registrars are a key source of information on such marriages (via section 24 reports) but the level of reporting from them varies widely. The Committee recommends more training for registrars especially in areas where the number of section 24 reports are low in comparison with similar areas. The registrars also report little or no feedback from the Home Office on the outcome of the section 24 reports, and the Government should ensure this is given in future. Statistics on the number of prosecutions or removals from the UK as a result of sham marriage are lacking, and without them it is hard to believe the Government is giving this problem the priority it warrants. Other areas covered in the report are: key indicators of the Directorate's performance; UK visas and immigration; immigration enforcement; Border Agency backlogs.

  • ISBN: 9780215075628
  • 11.00
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Sport

Women and sport: first report of session 2014-15: report, together with formal minutes relating to the report.

House of Commons papers (2014-15) - 513.
Corporate Author:
Culture, Media and Sport Committee
Author:
John Whittingdale (chairman)

In this report, Women and Sport, the Culture, Media and Sport Committee expresses concern about the long-term health and social care implications of the low participation rates in sport by women and girls, and urges a more imaginative approach by schools, sports governing bodies and relevant government departments to engaging women in sport. The Committee is especially concerned that many girls are put off sport by their experience of school games lessons, and it focuses a number of its recommendations on making school sport more appealing to girls. Almost without exception, whether the comparison is made by ethnic group, income status or age, women and girls are less likely to participate in sport than men. Women's sport has for too long been seen as an add-on to men's sport, of less interest to both male and female spectators. Girls give up sport at an earlier age than boys, and are less likely than men to sustain participation into adulthood, as other responsibilities reduce leisure time. Even for those who do want to continue to participate, there are problems of accessibility, availability of suitable facilities and cost. At elite level, there has until recently been a reluctance in the media to cover women's sport, which arguably has dampened potential interest among spectators and possible commercial sponsors, which in turn has led to low interest amongst the media. More work is needed to entrench the virtuous circle of good media coverage/higher spectator or viewer engagement/greater sponsorship and a more attractive product/greater media interest.

  • ISBN: 9780215075574
  • 12.00
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